Tag Archives: Lists

5 reasons why content marketing has reached saturation point #check

” I am not going to sit on my ass as the events that affect me unfold to determine the course of my life. I’m going to take a stand. I’m going to defend it. Right or wrong, I’m going to defend it”
Cameron Frye, Ferris Beuller’s Day Off (1986)

Here are a few rules on how to write interesting content:

1. Catchy listicle title (check)
2. Controversial point of view (check)
3. Offer sage advice on content marketing and how it can benefit your business, project, blog, life choices… (check)
4. Call to action at the end of this article to read more about my views on things marketing related and what makes me stand out from other blogs (check)
5. Write a list. (check)

According to this grandiose list of things to make me stand out as a content marketer (I’ve done a lot of reading and following accounts that constantly remind me of the need to write ‘killer’ content – don’t shoot me, aim your gun praise at the messenger who share such articles across numerous platforms), I’ve followed the ‘rules’ of content marketing.

Except I haven’t.

Content marketing has gotten to a level where I simply can’t keep up anymore. Whether it be a snazzy list from Buzzfeed on the numerous shades of tea (mine’s a builders, splash of milk, no sugar – I’m sweet enough thanks ☺) to Upworthy sharing a video on the plight of female vegan rats and the persecution they face from evil extermimators (so sad). This constant fight for my eyeballs and my attention can be overwhelming in this day and age. If it isn’t a picture of cute cats, then it’s another listicle of the things I can be doing to improve my life or educate myself more on something I’m likely to forget in a few days. Spare me the thought on big data and how wonderful it is (yes, Big data does have its merits, but only if you can extract numbers that are useful and relevant to whatever it is you do).

Is there a need to write content for contents sake? Will the world stop if I struggle to engage you with my written thoughts and musings? Probably not, however there will always be bloggers, writers, journalists, tweeters, et al. vying for my (and everyone else’s) attention. I do enjoy reading new articles, watching videos and learning a bit every day. I just enjoy learning at my own pace. The effect this content overload has on my concentration is probably the reason why tabbed browsing is so essential to me (heck, I even have ‘Have I Got News For You?’ on in the background whilst writing this blog entry on my smartphone as I glance at my laptop).

Anyhow, I digress. I don’t want another article telling me how to improve my content strategy or write killer content. It’s become so saturated that almost every other article reads the same. Even the lists are the same. No idea’s original, nothing new under the sun, and I’m feeling the burn.

I admire a writer’s honest, real and authentic point of view, I really do. I just want my attention span back so I can take it in, one article, one tab, one video, one picture at a time. So the next time you’re faced with a sea of words and images floating around the Internet, take a deep breath, swim through it, and pick what is relevant to you.

Thank you.

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Magic Number Three: 3 elements for a modern-day marketer to ponder

3 Is A Magic Number

“Three is a magic number” – Schoolhouse Rock

Since I’ve started writing my marketing blog, I have come to realise that other blogs that I have visited and read have this common habit of writing lists. Lists are rather useful ways of distilling a multitude of thoughts about one subject. From topics such as the top three inbound marketing strategies for mobile apps to 25 sneakers to own before you die, lists are a useful way of increasing visitor traffic, gleaning reader’s opinions and objections to your ‘definitive’ lists and generally showing you know your topic (supposedly…). Ironically, from my own general reading and discussions with a good friend of mine on the field of marketing has highlighted some interesting points in this current internet/data/technology era (I deleted all three because I couldn’t make up my mind). Anyhow, I digress. Here are the three elements that a modern-day marketer should consider for future market and business development.

1. “Free” products

When you consider how some ideas were conceived (i.e. Dropbox, Spotify, Farmville, Google Docs, etc.), they created services that people could utilise and get to grip with for ‘free’. The ‘Freemium’ model is a useful model, especially for start-up companies, to acquire a large user base where a portion of them can be converted into paying customers.

Consider Dropbox for example, which is a cloud storage service where users are initially offered 2 GB free storage. For a user to increase their storage capacity, they can either through referrals (500 MB per referral, up to 18 GB = 36 new users) or by subscribing to their ‘Pro’ plan for even greater storage (starting at 100 GB). Dropbox is an exponent of the ‘freemium’ model, taking advantage of rapidly decreasing prices in storage space and the shift towards cloud computing to increase the number of users and to generate income from power users derived from their user base.

Such models do need to be scrutinized, as they can be rather costly if they are not ‘leveraged’ properly in terms of the product/service offering, however they can be very successful for growing a business, as Dropbox can testify.

2. Marketing the product OR the product does the marketing?

Some companies are market/marketing driven whilst others are product-driven, relying on its relative strengths for the marketing sales pitch. Take Microsoft and Apple for instance. Here is the Microsoft advert for their Surface tablet.

Microsoft Surface Commercial

Apple iPad Commercial

As you can see from these commercials, Microsoft has gone for the more visual, dramatic, let’s-put-on-a-song-and-dance approach in showing off their Surface tablet, whereas Apple have gone for the ‘Let’s show you what the iPad and the iPad mini can do’ approach. Microsoft package and wrap up their product in the most glamorous fashion, marketing it in a way where it sells you the dream. Apple’s approach is clean and minimalistic, showing the product in action and its features. There’s no right or wrong way in how to market or promote a product, however the approach a marketer should decide on depends on how they want to present their offering to their target market and customer.

3. Innovation

How were Nintendo, Nokia and Google initially founded? Nintendo initially started by making playing cards back in 1889. Nokia’s first steps as a company was as a Finnish paper manufacturer back in 1865, and Google’s story started as an search engine called ‘BackRub’ from the creative minds of Larry Page and Sergey Brin back in 1996.

Where are they now? Nintendo is now one of the biggest computer game console manufacturers across the globe, creating iconic characters such as Mario, Zelda and Donkey Kong. Nokia is one of the world’s biggest manufacturers of mobile phone devices, creating classic models such as the 5110 and the current Lumia 920. Google is now the web’s go-to page for search results and has expanded into other areas, from creating the Android mobile platform to offering map services on the internet. Despite Nintendo and Nokia being many years older than Google, who are the gifted genius wunderkid, what has kept these three global icons continuing their longevity is innovation.

Through constant change and adapting to future needs and disrupting existing business models and paradigms, these companies have survived the test of time whilst maintaining their brands by pushing new boundaries and frontiers in their respective fields. Who would have thought Google would be competing with Nokia in the mobile industry?

These are my thoughts on the elements that a modern-day marketer must ponder in order to create new markets and develop and grow their business respectively.

What are your thoughts? Please comment and connect with me via Twitter @ChuxOnye and via LinkedIn.